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Corrections

Hopefully this will be a very short page!

At Least It’s Warmer There

Alamogul pointed out that this picture on p. 175 was taken at the Equator,not the North Pole. Duh! :-)

Waymarking Fee

On page 37,we stated that Waymarking.com carries a separate subscription fee. While that is technically correct,the statement left the impression that paying members of Geocaching.com must pay a second fee to use Waymarking.com. In fact,there is no additional fee required for paying Geocaching.com members.

Dumb moose-stakeThis elk waylaid Gary &Vicky for more than an hour

The animal shown in the photo on page 207 is an elk,not a moose. It’s still a big animal!

10th Anniversary Revamp

In honor of the 10th anniversary of geocaching in 2010,Groundspeak made a number of changes to geocaching.com. The most noticeable one was the addition of a special section devoted to memorable geocaching stories (gee,why didn’t we think of that?) as well as an excellent blog. The cache description pages appear to be largely unchanged,although Groundspeak has removed the ability to download in PDF format that we referenced on page 22.

Just a Minute!

Bob of Bob&Brenda writes:

I paid particular attention to the example on page 152 (“Why Are We Telling You This”) where you state that:

(a) A cache is located at N 41° 40.514 W073° 53.969,and
(b) the geocacher is located at N 41° 40.529 W073° 53.919.
(c) Therefore,the geocacher is 15″north (529 minus 514) and 50″east (969 –919) of the cache.

However,it seems to me that the geocacher is 0.9″north and 3.0″east of the cache,calculated as follows:
- north:40.529′–40.514′= 0.015′* 60 seconds/minute = 0.9″
- east:53.969′–53.919′= 0.050′* 60 seconds/minute = 3.0″

Or,am I not understanding the coordinate system correctly?

You understand the coordinate system perfectly,Bob. It’s we who were mistaken.Our error was in denoting the three digits to the right of the decimal as seconds instead of minutes. Because there are 60 seconds in a minute,we should have multiplied the distance between the cacher and the cache by 60 to express it in seconds. Thanks for a great catch.

By the way,if you’re confused by different formats by which coordinates are expressed in the commonly used WGS84 datum,an easy rule of thumb is to multiply by 6 or divide by 6 to convert between the formats. So in the example mentioned above,N 41° 40.514 translates to 41.67523.  If you ignore the decimals and divide the number to the right of 41° by 6,you get 672.5333,which corresponds to the second expression. Groundspeak’s Waypoint Conversion utility is much better,but this basic math is sufficient to use in the field.


We heard from a couple of people about an error on page 147 in which we incorrectly stated that “each minute is divided into 360 seconds.”Any idiot (and we include ourselves in that category) knows a minute has 60 seconds. We can’t remember if this was a typo or bad information on our part,but in either case,we messed up.


We incorrectly stated on page 147 that the distance between longitudinal lines 45° from the equator is half that of the distance at the equator. Not so,notes Denjoa. That milestone occurs at 60°. We’re now wishing we had listened better during geometry class.

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